IBM and MIT team on cognitive computing, machine vision, artificial intelligence for healthcare

The organizations are building a research laboratory for brain-inspired machine comprehension to develop systems that mimic certain human abilities.
By Bernie Monegain
11:08 AM
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IBM MIT machine vision

IBM Research and the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have joined forces to further develop the scientific field of machine vision – a core aspect of artificial intelligence.

Big Blue and MIT will build the IBM-MIT Laboratory for Brain-inspired Multimedia Machine Comprehension, or BM3C, in Cambridge, Mass.

Together they plan to develop cognitive computing systems that mimic the human ability to understand and integrate input from multiple sources for use in a variety of computer applications in industries such as healthcare, education, and entertainment.

MIT researchers will collaborate with IBM scientists and engineers who will provide technology expertise and advances from the IBM Watson platform.

The BM3C will address technical challenges around both pattern recognition and prediction methods in the field of machine vision that are currently impossible for machines alone to accomplish.

Beginning this month, the collaboration will bring together leading brain, cognitive, and computer scientists to conduct research in the field of unsupervised machine understanding of audio-visual streams of data, using insights from next-generation models of the brain to inform advances in machine vision.

Such advances could change lives, according to the researchers, from helping clinicians improve elderly and disabled care to enabling organizations to maintain and repair complex machinery.

"In a world where humans and machines are working together in increasingly collaborative relationships, breakthroughs in the field of machine vision will potentially help us live healthier more productive lives," Guru Banavar, chief scientist, cognitive computing and VP at IBM Research, said in a statement.


 Learn more at the Big Data & Analytics Forum 2016 in Boston Oct. 24-25. 

⇒ MIT professor's quick primer on two types of machine learning for healthcare

⇒ Must-haves for machine learning to thrive in healthcare


Twitter: @Bernie_HITN
Email the writer: bernie.monegain@himssmedia.com

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