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All-flash and hybrid array purchases prominent in 2018 budgets

Among other priorities, respondents indicated a continuing demand for data management and data reduction tools.

Jeff Rowe | May 07, 2018 12:00 am

Surging data growth has been putting pressure on storage systems, and to cope many organizations in healthcare and other sectors are considering all-flash or hybrid arrays.

That’s one finding from a recent 2018 IT Priorities Survey, which found 25 percent of companies are considering one or the other option.  Overall, on-premises storage infrastructure is a priority at 37 percent of responding companies.

 “A new wrinkle in IT spending priorities for 2018 is the emergence of nonvolatile memory express (NVMe) flash storage,” the survey also found. “Although still in its early days, nearly 7 percent of data center administrators said they will invest in NVMe-based flash this year.”

At the same time, storage with converged systems continues to gain attention in primary storage. Among survey respondents, “38 percent will deploy hyper-converged infrastructure (HCI), compared with 23 percent who lean toward converged infrastructure, as a data center networking initiative. Both HCI and converged infrastructure come in at 21 percent when the question is limited to using those technologies for primary storage initiatives, however.”

A hyper-converged platform combines computing, networking, storage and virtualization resources integrated as a single managed appliance. Converged infrastructure allows the system components to be separated from the chassis and used individually.  

Not surprisingly, cloud spending also factors heavily in the year’s budgets.  While the number of companies planning to use cloud storage for primary applications dropped to 39 percent from 48 percent from those who said they would be spending on public and private cloud initiatives in 2017, “nearly one in five data centers will turn to the cloud for production workloads, while 21percent expect to use public cloud providers. Eighteen percent will launch private, on-premises clouds.”

 

 

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