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HIMSS Analytics studies reveal 8 insights on future proofing healthcare

Healthcare leaders address artificial intelligence, population health and precision medicine adoption.
By Intel
09:30 AM
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Future-proofing AI

Artificial intelligence, population health and precision medicine are all on the minds of healthcare leadership according to a recent series of studies conducted by HIMSS Analytics, and sponsored by Intel[1]. These three topics will all affect healthcare, according to respondents. But respondents’ opinions varied as to which of the three are most relevant and which are most likely to impact healthcare in the near future.

Respondents included business leaders, IT leaders, IT professionals and clinical staff at organizations ranging in size from fewer than 50 beds to more than 500 beds. Below are eight takeaways from the series of studies, on how respondents anticipate artificial intelligence, population health and precision medicine will impact healthcare.

1. Precision medicine seen as most transformative

Seventy-eight percent of respondents characterized precision medicine as transformative; 67 percent viewed AI as such; and 62 percent viewed population health as transformative. The director of financial operations at a 500-plus bed organization said, “I think [precision medicine] is the future of medicine.” 

2. Population health essential to the organization’s success

A majority of respondents (58 percent) identified population health as “essential to my organization’s success.” The director of information services at a 500-plus bed organization said: "[Population health] is very essential. ... We have really worked toward using data to point us in the right direction as far as how we do the things we do to get the best outcomes." Only 46 percent felt precision medicine was essential, and less than one-third (30 percent) felt AI was essential to their organization’s success.

3. Precision medicine relevant to patient’s health and well-being

The vast majority of respondents (84 percent) identified precision medicine as “relevant to patients’ health and well-being.” Seventy-nine percent identified population health as relevant to patients’ health and well-being, and less than half (48 percent) felt AI is essential to patients’ health and well-being.

4. Population health and precision medicine seen as relevant to the organization; AI less so

Three-quarters (76 percent) said population health is “relevant to my organization.” Fifty-seven percent said precision medicine was similarly relevant, and only 42 percent identified AI as relevant to their organization.

5. Population health a priority at most organizations

Fifty-nine percent of respondents indicated population health was a priority at their organization. Thirty-two percent identified precision medicine as a priority, and only 19 percent identified AI as their organization’s priority. The director of analytics at a 500-plus bed organization said: “We have elevated population health to a very high strategic priority. … In fact, we just created a new C-suite position, a chief population health officer, with responsibilities across the whole network. That was a pretty dramatic commitment on the part of our leadership.”

6. Technology infrastructure supports population health, but not precision medicine or AI

With respect to technology, more than one in three (34 percent) feel prepared to support population health initiatives; 61 percent feel moderately prepared; and only 5 percent feel unprepared. Respondents feel less confident about their technology infrastructure in relation to precision medicine and AI initiatives. Only 18 percent feel prepared for precision medicine; 60 percent feel moderately prepared; and 22 percent feel their current technology infrastructure leaves them unprepared to meet precision medicine goals. With respect to AI, only 10 percent feel prepared; 64 percent feel moderately prepared; and 27 percent feel their current technology infrastructure leaves them unprepared to support AI initiatives.

7. Staffing/in-house expertise support population health, but not precision medicine or AI

Twenty-three percent of respondents feel prepared to achieve population health goals with current staffing levels and in-house expertise. Seventy-three percent feel moderately prepared, and only 5 percent feel unprepared to achieve population health goals with current staffing levels and expertise. Conversely, only 8 percent feel prepared to achieve precision medicine goals with current staffing levels and in-house expertise; 67 percent feel moderately prepared; and 23 percent feel unprepared. With respect to AI, only 4 percent feel prepared; 67 percent feel moderately prepared; and 29 percent feel unprepared.

8. Population health to have biggest impact in next two years

Fifty percent of respondents believe population health will have a significant impact on their organization within the next two years. Only one in four (25 percent) believe precision medicine will have a similar significant impact, and 24 percent believe AI will have a major impact on their organization within the next two years.  

Access more information from this sponsor here: How AI/Cognitive Computing Fits into the Healthcare Picture.

 


[1]“Future Proofing Healthcare: Artificial Intelligence,” “Future Proofing Healthcare: Population Health,” and “Future Proofing Healthcare: Precision Medicine,” conducted by HIMSS Analytics on behalf of Intel, September 2017.

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