URAC standards put to the test

Beta users try out new clinical integration measures

Several organized physician groups are beta testing URAC’s new clinical integration accreditation program standards. The independent standards organization created the new program to serve as a road map for health providers to achieve clinical integration and accountable care. By earning URAC accreditation, providers will demonstrate they are delivering improved patient care and reducing costs.

URAC’s clinical integration accreditation program guides healthcare providers in a number of areas for transforming care delivery, including operations, health information technology, clinical management, care coordination and population health.

“We value the insights the beta testers have shared about URAC’s clinical integration accreditation,” Jane Webster, senior vice president for research, development and planning at URAC, said in a news release. “Feedback from healthcare providers helps to develop a product that matches industry needs. The beta testers also gain an advantage in the market by becoming early adopters, building the organizational foundation needed to become a fully accountable clinically integrated network.”

Clinically integrated providers unite around the needs of each patient, delivering care based on a common set of clinical best practices. URAC’s new standards have been designed to align with Federal Trade Commission antitrust regulations. The program is designed to work for a variety of health providers, from small to large, including specialty groups.

The benefits of becoming clinically integrated are substantial for improving care delivery, reducing cost, and demonstrating evidence-based outcomes, say URAC officials. Hallmarks include seamless care coordination, timely sharing of patient medical information, and close tracking of care referrals and follow-up.

Providers beta testing URAC’s clinical integration accreditation program are:

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