Physician network to use genomic-based preventive healthcare

By Molly Merrill
12:00 AM
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MDVIP, Inc., a national network of physicians based in Boca Raton, Fla., is collaborating with a personal genomics testing company in an effort to integrate genomic-based preventive healthcare in physician offices.

This initiative will provide MDVIP's affiliated physicians with a genomic testing service from Redwood Shores, Calif.-based Navigenics.

Navigenics will provide MDVIP patients and their affiliated physicians with insight into their personal genetic predisposition for developing certain medical conditions where primary or secondary prevention could improve health outcomes.

"We have for many years been closely watching the field of genomic testing evolve into a tool that can enhance and inform the practice of preventive medicine," said Edward Goldman, MD, CEO of MDVIP. "We believe that Navigenics' preventive genomics service has the potential to be an innovation that could significantly enhance patient care."

The Navigenics test will identify individuals' genetic markers for developing such conditions as type 2 diabetes, cancer, heart attack, and celiac disease. Navigenics will  also provide board-certified Genetic Counselors that will collaborate with MDVIP physicians to help patients chart and implement a personalized wellness course to help decrease their overall risk, delay disease onset, or prevent it altogether.

"MDVIP physicians are national leaders in improving patients' lives through leading-edge preventive medicine," said Vance Vanier, MD, chief medical officer of Navigenics. "By thoughtfully incorporating genomic testing into their daily practice, these doctors will help to define the standards in which preventive genomic medicine will be integrated into patient care for decades to come."

MDVIP and Navigenics have spent six months studying the physician and patient experience of integrating preventive genomics in over forty clinical encounters.

"The results were impressive," said Goldman. "The patients overwhelmingly found the experience positive, they felt empowered rather than anxious, and they indicated a desire to change their lifestyles and more productively work with their physicians. We think there is tremendous value in bringing Navigenics' responsible approach to incorporating this technology into patient care."

Andre Sanschagrin, who participated in MDVIP's pilot study, said, "In my practice, patients are increasingly asking for more information about preventing disease, including what their genes might say about their personal risk factors. The tools included in Navigenics' service help me provide greater insight into what specific risks my patients may face, and help strengthen the physician-patient relationship as we work together to find ways to mitigate those risks. It really gives you a glimpse of how you can pull the future of medicine closer to today."

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