3 hospitals go for big change

Hospitals are changing business as usual in favor of new approaches to care

Hospitals across the country are taking bold steps to improve care and transparency as the healthcare system as a whole changes. Here are three whose recent announcements reflect some of the big changes that are under way for the entire healthcare system. One is looking to new clinical and business models for delivering care, another has connected its heart program information to three data registries, and a third has made the entire EMR available to its patients. All three initiatives reflect a new approach to improving care and engaging patients.

Georgia Regents Medical Center

Georgia Regents Medical Center, Georgia’s public academic health center, announced a 15-year alliance with Royal Philips to enable increasingly patient-centered approaches to care and to create an innovative business model that addresses current and future clinical, operational and equipment needs of GRMC’s multiple sites.

The alliance – a $300 million deal – is a first-of-its-kind delivery model in the United States, according to executives at the health system and Philips. Through the agreement, the largest of its kind in the United States for Philips, the company will provide GRMC with a broad range of consulting services, advanced medical technologies, and operational performance, planning and maintenance services with pre-determined monthly operational costs over a 15-year term.

The alliance will broadly support the Georgia Regents Medical Center, Children’s Hospital of Georgia, Georgia Regents University Cancer Center and the health system’s numerous outpatient clinics, which serve the medical needs of four to six million people, across Georgia and South Carolina.

"Our goal is to foster an atmosphere of meaningful innovation that will have a significant and positive impact on the health of our patients,” says David S. Hefner, CEO for Georgia Regents Medical Center.

[See also: Georgia system, Philips sign $300M deal.]

Miami Children’s Hospital

The Heart Program at Miami Children’s Hospital integrated its electronic medical record with the three North American registry databases for congenital heart disease. The hospital became the first in the world to do so. Already known around the world for its IT leadership in the care of children with heart disease, the hospital's move promises a boost in patient care and safety.

The integration of the hospital’s Cerner EHR with registry databases for surgical patients, catheterization patients and cardiac ICU patients will also improve family access, research to better understand the genomics of congenital heart disease and enable public reporting of outcomes.

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