Rand study cites dissatisfaction with health IT

A new study by the Rand Corporation indicates that, perhaps not surprisingly, many doctors are not quite as enamored of new health IT as advocates would like.

According to the study, many providers think that EHRs, "widely touted as technological tools to improve patient care, have in fact increased physicians' workloads and administrative burdens. Additionally, ... physicians complained that their digital record systems are interfering with face-to-face encounters with their patients ... Couple the burden and disappointment of inadequate EHRs with the added obligation of entering data to a patient record at the rate of 30-40 keystrokes per patient, and physicians are left with much less time for real patient care."

Despite their dissatisfaction, providers aren't dismissing the value of technology, but they argue "that better care depends on listening to and examining the patient through their history and physical, albeit technology has a role in diagnosis and confirmation of findings."

 

This post originally apeared on HIMSS Future Care.